Mr. Antoine Hunter

A headshot of Antoine Hunter with Ebony dreadlocks in a low half braid and a full beard. Antoine is wearing a sienna top and smiling with his head tilted slightly to the right. Dark Milk Chocolate smooth skin which he got from his mother.
Photo Credit: Mark Kitaoka

“African, Indigenous, Deaf and Disabled are a group of people often overlooked in any industry. I believe everyone should be a part of something with everyone having a space to learn from each other and respect each other’s differences.”

— Mr. Antoine Hunter

Description of Mr.Antoine Hunter’s Headshot Above:

A headshot of Antoine Hunter with Ebony dreadlocks in a low half braid and a full beard. Antoine is wearing a sienna top and smiling with his head tilted slightly to the right. Dark Milk Chocolate smooth skin which he got from his mother.

About Mr.Antoine Hunter:

Bay Area native, Antoine Hunter also known Purple Fire Crow is an award-winning Internationally-known African-American, Indigenous, Deaf, Disable, choreographer, dancer, actor, instructor, speaker, Producer and Deaf advocate. He creates opportunities for Disable, Deaf and hearing artists and produces Deaf-friendly events, and founded the Urban Jazz Dance Company and Bay Area International Deaf Dance Festival.

Antoine has received numerous grants and awards including the inaugural Jeanette Lomujo Bremond Award for Humanity, Isadora Duncan (Izzie) for Bay Area International Deaf Dance Festival, and SF King of Carnaval.

Antoine’s work has been performed globally, most recently in Turkey, UK and Russia. He has lectured across the U.S. including at Kennedy Center’s VSA, Harvard and Duke University, and the National Assembly of State Arts. In 2019 alone, his company Urban Jazz Dance Company, an ensemble of professional Deaf and Hearing dancers, performed for and engaged more than 4,200 schoolchildren. His shoe company DropLabs and Susan Paley just released an innovative product to help people feel music through their shoes. He is Vice President of Deaf Counseling, Advocacy and Referral Agency (DCARA’s) Board. DCARA is a non-profit, community-based social service agency serving the deaf community. Established in 1962 as one of the first deaf-run agencies in the country. www.RealUrbanJazzDance.com

Why is disability inclusion important in different industries?  

Industry: Arts, Dance, Entertainment, Education, Health & Fitness, Modeling and Social Justice Activism.

African, Indigenous, Deaf and Disabled are a group of people often overlooked in any industry. I believe everyone should be a part of something with everyone having a space to learn from each other and respect each other’s differences. Advocating and fighting for the rights, inclusion and accessibility of many marginalized groups is important because once you focus on the intersecting identities then the faster it becomes acceptable and mainstream–which should be everyone’s priority. Example: a person can be Black, Deaf, Queer and Disabled in a wheelchair. Many hearing people want to lead us but don’t let us lead. I am here to say we can lead as a community.

Previous Projects, Featured Articles and Other Work: 

Master Class with Antoine Hunter | Office for the Arts at Harvard

Antoine Hunter is opening the door for Deaf dancers (oaklandside.org)

‘Deaf people rock’: Deaf Dance Festival founder Antoine Hunter speaks his truths, upbringing | Local News Matters

Be sure to follow Mr.Antoine on LinkedIn  ,TwitterInstagram, and Facebook for his latest updates.  

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