Carissa Madden

You will see a young Caucasian woman looking straight ahead. Her head is tilted at an 80 degree angle. She is wearing a white oxford shirt with a navy blue dress jacket. On the right side of the woman, she wears a small name tag. On the tag says, “UF Division of Student Affairs, University of Florida in navy blue. Underneath the University of Florida says, “CARISSA MADDEN” in a lighter blue color. Underneath the name says “Disability Resource Center” in blue. The woman has blue eyes with a tint of gray. Above her eyes are her eyebrows (both dark red and brown). Her hair color is dark red with blond highlights. The length of her hair stops at her shoulders. She has dimples with light rosy cheeks.

“Disability inclusion is important in higher education because more students are furthering their education. Accessibility brings more awareness in higher education especially in the 21st Century.”

— Carissa Madden

Description of Carissa’s Headshot Above:

You will see a young Caucasian woman looking straight ahead. Her head is tilted at an 80 degree angle. She is wearing a white oxford shirt with a navy blue dress jacket. On the right side of the woman, she wears a small name tag. On the tag says, “UF Division of Student Affairs, University of Florida in navy blue. Underneath the University of Florida says, “CARISSA MADDEN” in a lighter blue color. Underneath the name says “Disability Resource Center” in blue. The woman has blue eyes with a tint of gray. Above her eyes are her eyebrows (both dark red and brown). Her hair color is dark red with blond highlights. The length of her hair stops at her shoulders. She has dimples with light rosy cheeks.

About Carissa Madden:

Hello, everyone! My name is Carissa Madden, M.Ed. and I was born and raised in Connecticut. I earned my Master’s degree in Special Education and a Graduate Certificate in Disabilities from the University of Florida. I am a disability advocate and I hope to work in higher education especially with disability services. My vision is for everyone having access to all resources including education, community, health, and other quality of life sources. Some of my goals are to write and publish books, and talk at social justice events about what it is like to have autism.

Why is disability inclusion important in higher education?  

Disability inclusion is important in higher education because more students are furthering their education. Accessibility brings more awareness in higher education especially in the 21st Century. Under several disability legislation including the American with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 protects individuals with disabilities who wish to attend to college. All students, staff, faculty, and administration in higher education have access to all resources. Access for all!

Research Interests:

  • Disability Awareness
  • Social Justice
  • Assistive Technology
  • Education
  • Special Education
  • Higher Education
  • Student Affairs
  • Accessibility
  • Diversity and Inclusion
  • Disability Legislation and Policy
  • Autism
  • Universal Design for Learning
  • American Sign Language
  • Deaf Culture
  • Mental Health and Counseling Services
  • Professional Development
  • Career Readiness
  • Student Empowerment Organizations
Previous Projects, Featured Articles and Other Work: 

1. Gators celebrate achievements at Summer commencement By Ashley Lazarski, Staff Writer at The Independent Florida Alligator

2.  Support Us University of Florida: Division of Student Affairs

3. UF’s Disability Resource Center recognized as No. 6 By Sarina Nunes, Alligator Contributing Writer at The Independent Florida Alligator

4. UF hosts lecture on disability activist Ed Roberts By Jeana Fraser, Contributing Writer at The Independent Florida Alligator

Be sure to follow Carissa Madden on LinkedIn for her latest updates.  

For sponsorships + brand integrations, collaborations, consultations, speaking opportunities, or interviews, email info@theresourcekey.com. Business inquiries only.   

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